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James Sumpter - May 1, 2024

1 Samuel 28 - No Hope, and Without God - Wednesday Evening Prayer Meeting 5-1-2024

Hopelessness is a scary and dangerous thing, but it is not always evident. Hopelessness can be seen in a couple different ways in someone’s life. Someone in a discouraged or depressed state can become unrealistically negative. Perhaps even more often, someone can be hopelessly shortsighted. They have an unrealistically positive state of mind. In either case, hopelessness affects decisions in a deep way. In 1 Samuel 28, we find Saul living a hopeless life. He rejected God, and in turn, God rejected Him. When Saul then had a need for God, God was not available to Him. You do not get to reject God, and then command His favorable presence. In his hopelessness, Saul turned to things he had once condemned. This chapter can leave us with questions about the power of things like sorcery, witchcraft, and necromancy. The fact that Samuel, a prophet of God, is summoned by a woman using evil practices is concerning to us. Is there true power in necromancy or occult influences? Why was Saul allowed to use this type of power for his own information? It is important up front to view this circumstance through the lens of Scripture. Particularly, what the Bible says about the event itself in 1 Chronicles 10:13-14. “So Saul died for his transgression which he committed against the Lord, even against the word of the Lord, which he kept not, and also for asking counsel of one that had a familiar spirit, to enquire of it; And enquired not of the Lord: therefore he slew him, and turned the kingdom unto David the son of Jesse.” What Saul did was warned strongly against in God’s Law (Lev. 18:31, 20:6, 20:27, Deut. 18:10-12). Saul rejected God and died under judgment. But how did Saul get here?

Scripture References: 1 Samuel 28:1-25, 1 Samuel 15:23, Deuteronomy 18:10-12, Leviticus 20:27, Leviticus 20:6, Leviticus 19:31, 1 Chronicles 10:13-14, Isaiah 8:19

From Series: "A Study of Samuel"

 

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James Sumpter - May 1, 2024

1 Samuel 28 - No Hope, and Without God - Wednesday Evening Prayer Meeting 5-1-2024

Hopelessness is a scary and dangerous thing, but it is not always evident. Hopelessness can be seen in a couple different ways in someone’s life. Someone in a discouraged or depressed state can become unrealistically negative. Perhaps even more often, someone can be hopelessly shortsighted. They have an unrealistically positive state of mind. In either case, hopelessness affects decisions in a deep way. In 1 Samuel 28, we find Saul living a hopeless life. He rejected God, and in turn, God rejected Him. When Saul then had a need for God, God was not available to Him. You do not get to reject God, and then command His favorable presence. In his hopelessness, Saul turned to things he had once condemned. This chapter can leave us with questions about the power of things like sorcery, witchcraft, and necromancy. The fact that Samuel, a prophet of God, is summoned by a woman using evil practices is concerning to us. Is there true power in necromancy or occult influences? Why was Saul allowed to use this type of power for his own information? It is important up front to view this circumstance through the lens of Scripture. Particularly, what the Bible says about the event itself in 1 Chronicles 10:13-14. “So Saul died for his transgression which he committed against the Lord, even against the word of the Lord, which he kept not, and also for asking counsel of one that had a familiar spirit, to enquire of it; And enquired not of the Lord: therefore he slew him, and turned the kingdom unto David the son of Jesse.” What Saul did was warned strongly against in God’s Law (Lev. 18:31, 20:6, 20:27, Deut. 18:10-12). Saul rejected God and died under judgment. But how did Saul get here?

Scripture References: 1 Samuel 28:1-25, 1 Samuel 15:23, Deuteronomy 18:10-12, Leviticus 20:27, Leviticus 20:6, Leviticus 19:31, 1 Chronicles 10:13-14, Isaiah 8:19

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James Sumpter - May 1, 2024

1 Samuel 28 - No Hope, and Without God - Wednesday Evening Prayer Meeting 5-1-2024

Hopelessness is a scary and dangerous thing, but it is not always evident. Hopelessness can be seen in a couple different ways in someone’s life. Someone in a discouraged or depressed state can become unrealistically negative. Perhaps even more often, someone can be hopelessly shortsighted. They have an unrealistically positive state of mind. In either case, hopelessness affects decisions in a deep way. In 1 Samuel 28, we find Saul living a hopeless life. He rejected God, and in turn, God rejected Him. When Saul then had a need for God, God was not available to Him. You do not get to reject God, and then command His favorable presence. In his hopelessness, Saul turned to things he had once condemned. This chapter can leave us with questions about the power of things like sorcery, witchcraft, and necromancy. The fact that Samuel, a prophet of God, is summoned by a woman using evil practices is concerning to us. Is there true power in necromancy or occult influences? Why was Saul allowed to use this type of power for his own information? It is important up front to view this circumstance through the lens of Scripture. Particularly, what the Bible says about the event itself in 1 Chronicles 10:13-14. “So Saul died for his transgression which he committed against the Lord, even against the word of the Lord, which he kept not, and also for asking counsel of one that had a familiar spirit, to enquire of it; And enquired not of the Lord: therefore he slew him, and turned the kingdom unto David the son of Jesse.” What Saul did was warned strongly against in God’s Law (Lev. 18:31, 20:6, 20:27, Deut. 18:10-12). Saul rejected God and died under judgment. But how did Saul get here?

Scripture References: 1 Samuel 28:1-25, 1 Samuel 15:23, Deuteronomy 18:10-12, Leviticus 20:27, Leviticus 20:6, Leviticus 19:31, 1 Chronicles 10:13-14, Isaiah 8:19

From Series: "A Study of Samuel"

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